I Walk In Their Shoes partners with Wildlife Conservation through Eco-Fashion

I Walk In their Shoes supports The Gabby Wild Foundation, Inc.  and their upcoming event at the University of Washington called The UW Conservation Catwalk to be held February 28th, 2014.  Models of all shapes and sizes will flaunt outfits inspired by our planet’s most endangered species and designed by celebrity designers from across the country and overseas. The event is to be held at the Grand Ballroom in the Husky Union Building. A variety of environmentally conscious celebrities & designers will be participating in support of the cause, which is to promote healthy, creative, and sustainable lifestyles. IWITS is providing raffle items and promotional materials to support the cause.  12 winners and finalists from the TV show Project Runway  as well as Seattle’s own Ahn Pham, Anglique Ashton and Julie Danforth are included in the mix of featured fashion designers in this exhibition. Student leaders  from the Student Health Consortium, ASUW and Conservation in style will be participating.  They are expecting approximately 1,200 student attendees and IWITS is proud to be a part of this event to support wildlife conservation on the runway.  For more information go to www.gabbywild.com  … Read more…

Can China Save the Elephants?

Animal Rescue Products joins the fight to stop the sale of Elephant Ivory as the demand for Ivory skyrockets. As many as 35,000 African elephants were killed in 2012 as the appetite by China increases. We simultaneously  have reached a huge victory as the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service crushed nearly 6 tons of confiscated ivory tusks and carvings which the U.S. stockpiled from this deadly trade. An important message is being sent to poachers and ivory cartels everywhere and maybe the black market sale of ivory will end as the tireless advocacy for elephants and other exotic species continues. Wildlife products are popular in China. This is somewhat similar to the 19th-century rise to wealth in the United States where the newly rich had pianos with sparkling ivory keys. For American buyers then and for Chinese consumers now, ivory is all about status.  Social pressure is most likely the driving force that will bring about change. We need to be clear that the current rate of killing elephants as well as rhinos, tigers, and many of species could soon result in them being completely vanished from the wild. Does this phase the current market? Not really. Luckily today we … Read more…

Ninety-Six Elephants Every Day

As we sit here in our comfortable office here at Animal Rescue Products also known as I WALK IN THEIR SHOES we hear of civil unrest providing poachers with an opportunity. There are many great folks out there saving wildlife and the Wildlife Conservation Society is one of them. Elephants lack protection and gangs equipped with cars and machine guns  can decimate a population. Ninety-Six Elephants are slaughtered every day for their ivory. Earlier this year 2013 the Wildlife Conservation Society with partners and supporters were able to secure an area in the Central African Republic of Dzanga Bai. The poachers retreated and only 26 elephants died but hundreds were saved. Reserves are often  becoming grave yards. The Wildlife Conservation Society is launching elephant protection programs in vulnerable locations across Africa. So today, we salute and donate what we can so animals and people can live in harmony. Consider our wildlife because without it our Eco-system would not work. We often forget this as we are busy with our lives, many of us just making ends meet. If you can only stop and say a prayer for a peaceful world do that. We are all in this together. Thank you … Read more…

Toucan Rescue Ranch in Costa Rica

THE TOUCAN RESCUE RANCH IS A RAINFOREST WILDLIFE RESCUE, REHABILITATION AND RELEASE ORGANIZATION. Animal Rescue Products supports wildlife conservation and our love for the Toucan and it’s habitat goes without saying. The sale of our comfort insoles results in donations to wildlife conservation efforts and we salute those on the front line. The Toucan Rescue Ranch is a licensed rescue facility in Costa Rica and continues to take in all types of rescued birds and animals. MINAET (Ministry of the Environment, Energy and Technology) continues to call on the Ranch to take in very severe cases, and works closely with the Ranch not only to rescue animals and birds but to train veterinarians and animal handlers and to educate school children and all community members on the importance of doing their best to preserve the diversity that is so important to their eco systems. Located in San Isidro, Heredia–the coffee and flower capital of Costa Rica they also have a volunteer program and a bed & breakfast. Leslie Howle & Jorge Murillo, directors, run the ranch and oversee all care and management. While you are in Costa Rica, the best way to learn about the Toucan Rescue Ranch is to … Read more…

Tony The Tiger Tells Kellogg’s, “Don’t Let Me Go Extinct”

Kellogg’s has formed a massive joint venture with a company that is destroying so much rainforest it’s been named the world’s least sustainable corporation. Kellogg’s has just launched a partnership with Wilmar International, the world’s largest palm oil trader and we at Animal Rescue Products are outraged! So, we are putting the word out. The palm oil industry has had a devastating impact on the forests of Southeast Asia, wiping out millions of hectares of forest and releasing hundreds of millions of tons of carbon into the atmosphere every year. And even among palm oil companies, Wilmar is especially terrible: Satellite evidence recently proved that it’s been illegally logging on protected forests for decades. More habitats being devastated. The rainforests of Indonesia are an ecological treasure: They’re home to critically endangered species like the orangutan and the Sumatran tiger, and they also store more carbon than the entire world emits in 9 years. Now snack and cereal giant Kellogg’s has made a huge deal with a company that’s wiping these forests off the map. Palm oil has been popular in Asia for years, but it’s increasingly being imported to the West, largely because it’s slightly cheaper than other vegetable oils … Read more…

Rescued Sloths Displaced by Deforestation

sloth

In Paramaribo, Suriname, sloths displaced by deforestation are rescued and released back into the wild with the help of Green Heritage Fund Suriname. See more in the Sloth Rescue video. This story is about Monique Pool, her Sloth Sanctuary and the rescue of 190 cuddly sloths. Deforestation leads to habitat loss and we are spotlighting the people in the field and organizations that are on the front line of saving rainforest wildlife and habitats. Monique Pool is the founder of Green Heritage Fund Suriname who, last October rescued about 190 Sloths. As the bulldozers cleared the land she was there to pick up the pieces. When  Conservation International came by to document the rescue they found volunteers helping in Pool’s back yard in makeshift pens. Pool had been accustomed to fostering one sloth at a time, so this has been a wild experience, even for her. She released as many animals as she could as quickly as possible, but she had to keep the baby sloths and their new moms until they were healthy enough to go back into the local rainforest, which spans six South American countries and is one of the most bio diverse in the world. The … Read more…

Favorite Proposal of Marine Protection area in Antarctica to save Wildlife

An International Group is Considering a Proposal to Make the Antarctic  the World’s Largest Marine Sanctuary The need to act quickly and protect the Southern Ocean and other Antarctic waters is pressing. The Antarctic’s ice shelves are melting at such a rate that they are losing 1.3 trillion kilograms of ice a year, as recent study says. The ice shelves also lose a trillion kilograms of ice a year when sections break off to form icebergs. Antarctica is not an isolated continent of snow and ice anymore. It is  home to millions of Adélie penguins and emperor penguins, dozens of species of whales, a myriad of fish species and other amazing creatures. But its rich and vast resources are under threat. A warming ocean is causing Antarctica’s ice shelf to melt and human activity — fishing and tourism — is altering Antarctica and the ecosystem that has been home to so many species for centuries. The Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR) — an international group whose members include Australia, New Zealand, the U.S., the U.K., Russia, China, Norway and France — is considering a proposal to turn 1.5 million square kilometers of ocean around the Antarctic … Read more…

Saving our Rainforests

We can Save the Rainforest

The National Cancer Institute: 70% of plants that are useful in the treatment of cancer are found exclusively in the rainforest. It is not the rainforests which are heavy laden with the solidified ‘syrup’  of age. It is us. The rainforest is a living entity, it is not heavy laden. If you want to save some of the beauty of our world which is alive and new, then save some of the  rainforest. For the first time in Peru, a large forest area will be protected according to plans which indigenous  forest people have helped to draw up. The ‘Master Plan’ for the Ashaninka Communal Reserve, which covers nearly half a million acres of mostly pristine rainforest, has been approved by the Peruvian government. This follows several years of work and a lengthy process of consultation with the Ashaninka people. For more information go to the The Rainforest Foundation in the UK who are securing lands and saving lives. One of our favorite birds, the Toucan, is important to the rainforest because they help to disperse seeds from the fruits and and berries they eat. Their habitats are dwindling along with many other wildlife species. The ultimate impact for our … Read more…

Mantee Family Life

Do Manatees Mate for life? Courtney Edwards, Staff Biologist at Save The Manatee Club says, “Male and female manatees do not mate for life. During breeding, a single female manatee, or cow, is usually followed by a group of a dozen or more males, or bulls, forming a mating herd. They appear to breed indiscriminately during this time. After breeding, the male manatee has no further involvement with the mother or calf. Once the calf is born, the mother will nurse the calf for one to two years. The cow-calf bond is very strong during this time, as the mother teaches the calf important survival skills, such as migration routes and where to find food and warm water. Once the calf leaves its mother, the breeding process will start again.” – See more at: http://www.savethemanatee.org/repro.htm … Read more…